Code of the District of Columbia

Subchapter IX. 1988


§ 1–1509.01. Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1988

(Effective October 8, 1988)

Prepared by the Mayor and transmitted to the Council of the District of Columbia on July 14, 1988, pursuant to the provisions of Section 422(12) of the Charter of the District of Columbia.

I. Purpose This plan changes the name of the Educational Institution Licensure Commission to the Education Licensure Commission and transfers the function of licensing and otherwise regulating proprietary schools from the Director, Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs to the Education Licensure Commission.

II. Change of Name The Education Institution Licensure Commission, established by § 3 of the D.C. Law 1-104, the Education Licensure Commission Act of 1976, D.C. Code § 31-1603 [§ 38-1303], is hereby renamed the Education Licensure Commission.

III. Transfer of Functions The functions with respect to proprietary schools vested in the Director of the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs by Council Regulation No. 71-30, as amended, 16 DCMR § 1200 et seq., Commissioner's Order 71-458 (December 28, 1971), Mayor's Order 78-42 (February 17, 1978), Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1983, and Mayor's Order 83-92 (April 7, 1983) are hereby transferred to the Education Licensure Commission.

IV. Organization The Mayor is authorized to organize the personnel and property of the Commission to fulfill the functions transferred by this plan.

V. Effective Dates This Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1988 shall become effective pursuant to the promulgation of an executive order of the Mayor establishing the same no later than thirty (30) calendar days after this plan has been approved in accordance with § 422(12) of the District of Columbia Self-Government and Governmental Reorganization Act, Public Law 93-198, D.C. Code § 1-242(12) [§ 1-204.22].


Prior Codifications

2001 Ed., Title 1, Chapter 15, Subchapter IX, Part A.

Mayor's Statement

Education is one of the highest priorities of my administration. I am dedicated to expanding educational opportunities for our citizens and improving the educational system in the District of Columbia, both public and private. This is a cornerstone of our programs for economic development and self-sufficiency.

As a step in this continuing effort, I have decided to consolidate some of the District of Columbia educational authorities and services, and to strengthen the role of the District Government in the area of postsecondary education. One such consolidation and strengthening is this Reorganization Plan, and the accompanying proposed amended regulations for proprietary schools.

In general, the proprietary schools have served the community well. They have provided trade, technical and self-improvement instruction beyond the high school level to students who did not seek a college education, but who aspired to careers requiring other kinds of knowledge, skills, and abilities. In many instances, these students became employable by this instruction, and upwardly mobile in their chosen field of work. Thus, the proprietary schools provide a service that has important results for the economy of the District, as well as the lives of individual citizens.

However, experience has shown that the provision of poor instruction or unexpected closure by a few such schools can have a serious harmful effect on the students. Students typically borrow significant amounts to pay tuition, and if they are left with unmarketable skills or a prematurely terminated education, they may be worse off than before matriculation. In such cases, the individual and his or her family suffers. So too do the other schools, who rely on their reputations to do business. And so too, does the District of Columbia, which loses not only the opportunity for adding to the available skilled work force, but also the opportunity for decreasing the demand for financial assistance to unemployed or underemployed residents.

For these reasons, it has become clear that strengthening the regulation of proprietary schools is in the public interest. Therefore, I have decided to transfer this function to the Educational Institution Licensure Commission, and change its name to the Education Licensure Commission. The Commission now licenses and regulates private institutions that offer college level education, and serves as the State Approving Agency for education programs eligible for veterans who get assistance from the Veterans Administration. The Commission members are qualified members of the higher education profession, with experience and expertise in regulating postsecondary educational institutions. The Commission has a fine record of protecting the community from college level diploma mills, and improving the education available to citizens of the District of Columbia.

In considering this additional assignment, the Commission has determined that amendments to the existing regulations are required. The Commission has prepared proposed amended regulations, which provide new educational criteria for licensing, new requirements for student records, and new authority for monitoring schools' compliance with the regulations. All of the business licensing requirements are retained. These proposed amended regulations are transmitted with this Plan for Council approval.

An increase in the cost of regulating proprietary schools will result from these steps. However, the increase is modest and will provide the resources for the Commission to carry out its new responsibilities.

The Plan and amended regulations will further integrate proprietary schools into the educational system in the District of Columbia, and provide the basis for improvements in the quality of instruction received by their students.

I urge the Council to join me in this improvement of our educational system, by approving the Reorganization Plan and the amended regulations.


§ 1–1509.02. Reorganization Plan No. 4 of 1988

(Effective December 15, 1988)

I. Purpose The purpose of this reorganization is to consolidate, within the Metropolitan Police Department, certain licensing and regulatory functions related to security officers, Regulation 74-31, enacted December 1, 1974, as amended by the Security Officer Licensing Facilitation Act of 1977, D.C. Law 2-29, effective October 26, 1977, the Uniform Requirements for Security Officers Amendment Act of 1984, D.C. Law 5-180, effective March 16, 1985, the End of Session Technical Amendments Act of 1984, D.C. Law 5-159, effective March 14, 1985 and functions related to private detectives pursuant to the Licensing and Bonding of Private Detectives, Regulation 70-30, enacted July 9, 1970, as amended by the Regulation Concerning Uniforms to be Worn by Specialmen and by Unarmed Uniformed Guards and Security Officers, Regulation 71-20, enacted June 6, 1971, the Regulation Establishing Standards for Certification and Employment of Security Officers, Regulation 74-31, enacted December 1, 1974 and the Security Officer Licensing Facilitation Act of 1977, D.C. Law 2-29, effective October 26, 1977.

II. Functions With Regard To Security Officers

The functions of administering applications, charging the license and examination fees, and the investigation, certification, and examination of applicants as well as issuing, denying, suspending, or revoking licenses, which were vested in the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs pursuant to Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1983, effective March 31, 1983, are hereby transferred to the Metropolitan Police Department.

With Regard To Private Detectives

The functions of administering applications, charging the license fee, issuing the license, and investigating and issuing identification cards as well as denying, suspending, or revoking the license, which were vested in the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs pursuant to Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1983, effective March 31, 1983, are hereby transferred to the Metropolitan Police Department.

III. Transfers All records relating to the duties and functions transferred in part II are hereby transferred to the Metropolitan Police Department.

IV. Organization The Chief of Police, Metropolitan Police Department, in the performance of the duties and functions assigned by this plan, is authorized to establish such organizational components with specified functions as the Chief of Police deems appropriate. The Director of the Planning and Development Division, Metropolitan Police Department, shall develop any reports and evaluation systems as necessary to assess the effect of the reorganization plan.

V. Effective Date The provisions of this plan shall become effective on a date to be specified by an Executive Order of the Mayor no later than 30 days after this plan becomes effective in accordance with section 422(12) of the District of Columbia Self-Government and Governmental Reorganization Act, P.L. 92-198, effective December 24, 1973, D.C. Code sec. 1-242(12) [§ 1-204.22].


Prior Codifications

2001 Ed., Title 1, Chapter 15, Subchapter IX, Part B.

Mayor's Statement

Reorganization Plan No. 4 of 1988, which would consolidate within the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) functions related to licensing and regulating security officers and private detectives, is the result of several years of planning between the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA) and the Metropolitan Police Department. The need for this reorganization grew out of the original rationale for establishing DCRA. This rationale was to create a central location in the District of Columbia to register and license businesses, individuals and activities.

In DCRA's "One-Stop" center for business licensing, the objective or centralizing the licensure functions could not be achieved for security officers and private detectives because of the various approvals needed from MPD. These approvals and fingerprinting were performed at three separate locations outside of DCRA's offices.

Now MPD's Security Officers Management Branch is located at the Reeves Center on 14th and U Streets, N.W. Thus, with this reorganization all the licensing functions will be in one location for security officers and private detectives. The reorganization will effectively eliminate the current division of regulatory functions by consolidating these functions within MPD. The result of this consolidation will be to streamline the administration and enforcement of these two business activities. In order to sufficiently carry out these consolidated functions, MPD will augment it's staff by four (4) new clerk positions.

Finally, this reorganization will affect only those licensing and regulatory functions which are now being performed by DCRA. Functions related to the licensing and regulation of security officers and private detectives now being performed by other Departments will remain in those Departments.

I stand ready to move forward with this reorganization.