Code of the District of Columbia

Subchapter XI. 1992


§ 1–1511.01. Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1992

(Approved July 2, 1992)

Prepared by the Mayor and transmitted to the Council of the District of Columbia on July 2, 1992, pursuant to the provisions of Section 422(12) of the District Charter, District of Columbia Self-Government and Governmental Reorganization Act, approved December 24, 1973 (87 Stat. 813; D.C. Code, sec. 1-242(12) [§ 1-204.22]).

I. Establishment An Unclaimed Property Unit is hereby established in the Executive Branch of the Government of the District of Columbia, under the supervision and control of the District of Columbia Controller within the Office of the District of Columbia Controller of the Office of Financial Management. The Unclaimed Property Unit hereby established, and the functions and personnel assigned thereto, shall constitute an organizational unit of the Office of the District of Columbia Controller.

II. Purpose The Unclaimed Property Unit is established in the Office of the District of Columbia Controller, under the supervision and control of the District of Columbia Controller, for the purpose of more efficiently operating the Government of the District of Columbia. To effect the enhancement of the District government's efficiency, the Unclaimed Property Unit will be aligned with the Office of the District of Columbia Controller, the office that is responsible for the District's financial management and control and that maintains the District's official accounts.

III. Functions All of the duties and functions of the Unclaimed Property Unit in the Department of Finance and Revenue established under The District of Columbia Uniform Disposition of Unclaimed Property Act, as amended, effective March 5, 1981 (D.C. Law 3-160; D.C. Code, sec. 42-201 [§ 41-101] et seq.) ("the Act"), the rules issued pursuant thereto and Mayor's Order 81-82, dated March 27, 1981, 28 DCR 1740 (April 17, 1981) which delegated to the Department of Finance and Revenue, the Mayor's authority to administer the Act and to issue rules are hereby transferred to the Office of the District of Columbia Controller within the Office of Financial Management.

IV. Transfers All positions, property, records and funds relating to the duties and functions transferred in this plan are hereby transferred to the Office of the District of Columbia Controller.

V. Organization The District of Columbia Controller of the Office of the District of Columbia Controller is authorized to organize the personnel and property transferred herein within any organizational unit as he or she deems appropriate to fulfill the functions transferred by this plan.

VI. Abolishment The existing Unclaimed Property Unit within the Department of Finance and Revenue is hereby abolished.

VII. Rescission All orders and parts of orders in conflict with any of the provisions of this plan are, to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed, except that any rules or regulations adopted or promulgated by virtue of the authority granted by such orders, shall remain in force until properly revised, amended or rescinded.

VIII. Effective Date This Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1992 shall become effective on a date to be specified by an executive order of the Mayor issued no later than 30 calendar days after this plan has been approved in accordance with the requirements of section 422(12) of the District of Columbia Self-Government and Governmental Reorganization Act, approved December 24, 1973 (87 Stat. 813; D.C. Code, sec. 1-242(12) [§ 1-204.22]), and section 5(c) of the Governmental Reorganization Procedures Act of 1981, effective October 17, 1981 (D.C. Law 4-42; D.C. Code, sec. 1-299.4(c) [§ 1-315.04]).


Prior Codifications

2001 Ed., Title 1, Chapter 15, Subchapter XI, Part A.

Mayor's Statement

The Unclaimed Property Unit of the Audit, Compliance and Investigation Administration of the Department of Finance and Revenue is responsible for the collection and maintenance of all abandoned tangible and intangible personal property reported and delivered to the Mayor for safekeeping and fiscal growth of the District of Columbia pursuant to the Uniform Disposition of Unclaimed Property Act of 1980, as amended, effective March 5, 1981 (D.C. Law 3-160; D.C. Code, sec. 42-201 [§ 41-101] et seq.). In addition, the Unclaimed Property Unit is required to attempt to locate and return the unclaimed property to the rightful owner.

To date, the Unclaimed Property Unit has collected approximately $47 million and has returned approximately $4 million to the rightful owners. As a result, over $42 million have been contributed to the fiscal development of the District of Columbia since the creation of the program.

I am committed to the most efficient operation of the District government. To this end, I submit herewith, Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1992 that would transfer the functions of administering the District of Columbia's unclaimed property program from the Department of Finance and Revenue to the Office of the District of Columbia Controller within the Office of Financial Management. The Reorganization Plan would transfer the entire Unclaimed Property Unit, including its staff of seven persons, its property, records and funding to the Office of the District of Columbia Controller.

To enhance the efficiency of the District government's operation, the reorganization would align the Unclaimed Property Unit with the Office of the District of Columbia Controller, the office within the District government that is responsible for the financial management of the District and that maintains the official accounts of the District.

The Unit's current alignment within the Department of Finance and Revenue does not conform to the Department's general mission: tax administration. Although the unclaimed property program produces revenue for the District, it is not a tax program. Instead, it is more appropriately characterized first, as a financial management and fiduciary service which the District renders to persons who have abandoned their property within our jurisdiction and then second, as a program that generates revenue for the District. Consequently, it is more efficient to place the program in the office that is charged with the management and control of the District's financial affairs. 1

1 Only 12 other states in the country have their unclaimed property programs within their Departments of Finance and Revenue or Departments of Revenue, while 25 states administer their programs through their Treasury Departments or Controller's Offices.


§ 1–1511.02. Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1992

(Effective October 1, 1992)

Prepared by the Mayor and transmitted to the Council of the District of Columbia, pursuant to the provisions of Section 422(12) of the Charter of the District of Columbia.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA OFFICE OF TOURISM AND PROMOTIONS

I. Establishment The Office of Tourism and Promotions ("Office") is hereby established in the Executive Branch of the Government under the Deputy Mayor for Economic Development (DMED). The Office shall be supervised and administered by a Director who shall be appointed by the Mayor to a position in the Executive Service pursuant to Title X of the District of Columbia Government Comprehensive Merit Personnel Act of 1978, D.C. Law 2-139, effective March 3, 1979, (D.C. Code former sections 1-611.1 - 1.611.2, and subject to the advice and consent of the Council. The Mayor's Special Assistant for Tourism shall be the Acting Director pending confirmation by the Council.

II. Purpose The purpose of the Office is to increase revenues generated by tourism and related promotional, leisure and entertainment activities. The Office of Tourism and Promotions will coordinate the economic development efforts of the city in the areas of tourism and conventions and will better serve local firms engaged in the tourism industry by providing a more efficient delivery of public services.

The Office coordinates the development of an integrated advertising, marketing and promotional plan for the District which will lead to increased business and leisure travellers to the District. Travellers will be encouraged to patronize Washington business establishments, thereby increasing employment and business opportunities for District residents and businesses. Every effort will be made to stimulate increased opportunities for small, minority and women-owned District-based businesses.

This Office shall also have the responsibility for promoting Washington, D.C., as a venue for film, television and recording production. Promotion of Washington, D.C., as a site for entertainment-related business activities fits neatly with tourism promotion. Out-of-state film, television and record companies need to be "sold" on Washington, D.C.

The monuments and other attractions, affordable hotel and guest accommodations, and neighborhood diversity are all selling points to be emphasized by both the tourism and entertainment functions in District government. These functions will be jointly promoted under the Office of Tourism and Promotions.

III. Organization The Director shall be appointed by the Mayor and shall report to the Deputy Mayor for Economic Development. The Director shall have oversight responsibility for the D.C. Committee to Promote Washington and the Office of Motion Picture and Television Development.

The Director shall initially hire two staff persons to carry out the functions of this Office. As need is demonstrated, justified and approved through budget authorization, additional staff may be hired to carry out the functions of the Office of Tourism and Promotions.

IV. Functions

A. The functions of the Office of Tourism and Promotions shall be to:

1. Coordinate and manage all District government activity related to tourism, convention and business travel and related promotional activities;

2. Serve as the Mayor's liaison to District agencies on issues affecting tourism and conventions;

3. Serve as a liaison to those agencies that affect the development or use of tourism attractions;

4. Maintain oversight on the use of Hotel Occupancy Tax ("HOT") dollars by promotional agencies, including the D.C. Committee to Promote Washington, the Washington, D.C. Convention and Visitors Association, the D.C. Chamber of Commerce and the Washington Convention Center;

5. Serve as liaison between government and the aforementioned agency recipients of HOT funds;

6. Insure that the Mayor's priorities relating to tourism and convention activities are conveyed to interested organizations and citizens;

7. Serve as the representative of the Mayor for tourism, promotion and convention related functions;

8. Arrange meetings, workshops, conferences and receptions to achieve the goals outlined in Section 2. above;

9. Encourage and assist in the coordination of activities that promote or create attractions in the District for the tourist or business traveller; and

10. Work to stimulate employment and economic development activities through tourism, entertainment and convention enterprises.

B. All functions heretofore performed by the Mayor's Special Assistant for Tourism are transferred to the Office of Tourism and Promotions.

V. Transfers All positions, property, records and unexpended balances of appropriations, allocation, and other funds available or to be made available relating to the duties and functions assigned herein are transferred to the Office of Tourism and Promotions. This includes all positions, budget and other available resources currently held in the Office of Business and Economic Development and allocated to the Office of Motion Picture and Television Development and to the D.C. Committee to Promote Washington.

VI. Abolishment The position of Mayor's Special Assistant for Tourism is abolished.

VII. Effective Date This Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1992 shall become effective on October 1, 1992, following Council review, in accordance with Section 422(12) of P.L. 93-198.


Prior Codifications

2001 Ed., Title 1, Chapter 15, Subchapter XI, Part B.

Mayor's Statement

The tourism industry is the heartbeat of private enterprise in the District of Columbia. Tourism is responsible for generating approximately $3 billion dollars in the District in annual revenues. The tourist industry generates much of the activity and business of our city and, for that reason, it is a priority in my economic development strategy.

More than 19 million visitors came to Washington, D.C. in 1991 for vacation purposes. Those leisure visitors who stay overnight, stay in Washington an average of 2.9 nights. An estimated 1.68 million of these overnight leisure visitors stay in the District of Columbia hotels producing 2,230,000 hotel room nights for the city. In addition to dollars spent in over 88 hotels, these visitors spend millions of dollars in the District of Columbia retail establishments, restaurants, theaters and on city transportation.

While our neighboring jurisdictions become more aggressive, the District cannot afford to stand still. The Office of Tourism and Promotions will work to make Washington, D.C., visitor-friendly. We must help neighborhoods become more aware of strategies to encourage visitors to move away from the monumental core and visit the other sections of the District. The government will place more signs in key locations to direct and inform the visitors. We must establish a first class visitor's center; we have to provide more parking for tour buses, and information for those who use tour bus companies.

The District of Columbia cannot rest on its laurels; nor can this government wait for business and leisure travellers to come to our city. The pursuit of the travel dollar is becoming an increasingly competitive strategy among U.S. jurisdictions and international destinations. The state of Virginia spends 10 million dollars annually on tourism promotions. It is no accident that we are familiar with its theme "Virginia is for Lovers." Their national and international advertising budget is $5.5 million, almost 5 times the amount of money expended by the District of Columbia government.

It is no accident that we know New York state's theme "I Love New York." Approximately ten years ago in the midst of a spate of negative publicity about the safety of New York City, the state legislators voted to support a phenomenal increase in tourism promotion dollars. This action successfully increased the number of visitors and revenue they generated.

This administration will promote tourism as a vehicle for increasing the tax base. It is estimated that tourism generates over $235 million in tax revenue for the District of Columbia each year. This is new money, completely derived from outside sources, that is poured into Washington's coffers. These funds are used to improve the quality of life for all District residents.

We have to encourage Washington Dulles International Airport to solicit more international flights that bring high spending visitors to our Nation's Capital. We are reviewing our tour guide examination process which is more than 20 years old. We must inform our taxi drivers, our police, our parking enforcement officers and other front line personnel that tourism is good for our city. Our visitors must be treated with courtesy and respect to encourage travellers to return. These are programs the Office of Tourism and Promotions will coordinate.

The District Government must spend more dollars on tourism promotion. I appreciate the Council's support of $700,000 in general revenue funds to be appropriated to the Washington Convention Center Enterprise Fund. These funds will be used by the D.C. Committee to Promote Washington to sustain the Committee's national and international advertising campaigns. I know the Council realizes that even with this appropriation, the District of Columbia will rank barely thirtieth (30th) out of fifty (50) states in comparison to the amount of money expended by other states on advertising. During the next fiscal year, we hope to come up with a city theme that will be adopted by individual hotels and businesses who will do their part to promote Washington, D.C., as a place to visit in the minds of potential travellers.

I have frequently stated my desire to make Washington, D.C., an entertainment hub. My enthusiasm for this industry is rooted in the economic benefits of entertainment-related activities. We must do a better job of promoting those entertainment venues like the Kennedy Center, the National Theatre, and Carter Barron. We must bring more international sporting events to our city, e.g., World Cup Soccer and Tour Du Pont. These events generate dollars and provide recreation for our residents and visitors. These events also create contracting opportunities for District based businesses and jobs for city residents.

Because our society is fascinated with sports and entertainment, media outlets tend to cover these events more. World Cup Soccer will be viewed internationally by an estimated 26 billion viewers. The District could not, on its own, afford to purchase that kind of advertising. Tour Du Pont, in its first year in Washington, D.C., was carried by CBS sports and ESPN cable live, reaching more than 10 million households.

Several motion pictures have been filmed in Washington, D.C., as a result of the successful efforts of the Mayor's Office of Motion Picture and Television Development. When productions are filmed here, revenue is generated for electricians, make-up artists, sound mixers, video companies, construction crews, truckers, caterers, etc. In addition, because of Washington's distinctive skyline, filming in our city also advertises the unique attractions of our city. The City Council wisely voted to expand staffing and increase our capacity to generate over $30 million in annual revenues for local businesses and the District's revenue fund.

We have tremendous resources and talents within our borders. My objective is to set priorities in cooperation with key business leaders affected by these programs so that real economic benefits can occur. The public/private partnership between the District government and the Hotel Association on the Convention Center expansion is but one of many examples that we will initiate to achieve our objectives.

I know that with your support our goals will be achieved and that the potential of tourism and entertainment promotion in Washington, D.C., will be realized.


§ 1–1511.03. Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1992

(Approved January 20, 1993)

Prepared by the Mayor and transmitted to the Council of the District of Columbia, pursuant to the provisions of section 422(12) of the District of Columbia Self-Government and Governmental Reorganization Act of 1973, approved December 24, 1973 (87 Stat. 790; Pub. L. 93-198; D.C. Code § 1-242(12) [1-204.22] (1992)), the Governmental Reorganization Procedures Act of 1981, effective October 17, 1981 (D.C. Law 4-42; D.C. Code § 1-299.1 through § 1-299.7 [§§ 1-315.01 through 1-315.07]), and § 128 of the Fiscal Year 1993 Budget Request Act (D.C. Act 9-186; 39 DCR 2674, 2686, April 17, 1992).

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA OFFICE OF BANKING AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

I. Transfer of OBFI Control Center The D.C. Office of Banking and Financial Institutions ("OBFI") is hereby transferred from the Deputy Mayor for Economic Development ("DMED") control center to a separate OBFI control center/responsibility center. OBFI will continue to be administered by the Superintendent and will remain a part of the economic development cluster reporting to the Mayor.

II. Purpose The purpose of this plan is to transfer the OBFI budget from the budget of the DMED to a separate OBFI responsibility/control center.

III. Organization There will be a transfer of OBFI's budget to a separate control/responsibility center. No organizational staffing or funding changes will occur at OBFI as a consequence of this shift other than the transfer of the authorization for one full time employee from the Office of International Business, a transfer of $18,000 to fund that position from the Office of Business and Economic Development, plus an overall budget increase of $68,000, all of which was approved by the Council in the FY 93 budget.

IV. Functions OBFI's functions are contained in the District of Columbia Regional Interstate Banking Act of 1985 Amendments Act of 1985, D.C. Law 6-107, effective April 11, 1986, codified in chapters 1, 4, 5, and 8 of title 26 [chapters 1, 2, 7, 13 of title 26] of the D.C. Code. These statutory duties of OBFI will remain unchanged as a result of this transfer.

V. Effective Date This Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1992 becomes effective the later of the date of Council approval in accordance with § 128 of the Fiscal Year of 1993 Budget Request Act (D.C. Act 9-186), or on a date thereafter to be designated pursuant to Executive Order of the Mayor.


Prior Codifications

2001 Ed., Title 1, Chapter 15, Subchapter XI, Part C.

Mayor's Statement

This Administration has made economic development a chief priority. As regulator of the District's financial institutions, the Office of Banking and Financial Institutions ("OBFI") has played a vital role in fostering economic development for the District, particularly for low- and moderate-income areas and those areas of the District which are traditionally underserved.

To further augment OBFI's pivotal role in effectuating the economic development cluster goals, we propose that OBFI become a separate control center, as distinguished from the current situation in which the OBFI budget is a part of the Deputy Mayor for Economic Development ("DMED") control center.

This shift will not result in any changes to the functions, staff or budget of OBFI. Nevertheless, it has become clear that OBFI's significant contributions to the economic development goals of the District warrant the creation of a distinct OBFI control center, comparable to other state banking regulators and on par with the other economic development cluster agencies.

I urge the Council to join me in establishing a separate control center for OBFI, by approving this Reorganization Plan.